Biggar says Wales 'paid the price' as France keep Grand Slam dream alive

Biggar says Wales 'paid the price' as France keep Grand Slam dream alive

Dan Biggar booted Wales' points as they lost out 13-9 in a tense Six Nations tussle in Cardiff, with France now one win from a Grand Slam.

Dan Biggar said Wales paid a high price for falling short at key moments after failing to halt mighty France in Cardiff.


A Six Nations Grand Slam is now within touching distance for Les Bleus after they overcame last year's champions 13-9 at the Principality Stadium, making it four wins from four.

Wales fought hard but rarely threatened a try, Jonathan Davies dropping the ball on the one occasion they looked like perhaps going over.

There was plenty to admire about the Welsh display, but Anthony Jelonch's early try was ultimately the difference between the sides.


In terms of metres carried, Wales edged France 353 to 284, and they were 156-96 ahead on the passes count, but France's defence was outstanding, and the hosts made too many errors.

Home captain Biggar told BBC One the outcome was "ultimately very, very disappointing".


He added: "This week I thought we were the better team for large periods of the game, and one or two big moments is what big Test matches hinge on, and we didn't quite nail those moments, and we paid the price.

"I'm so proud of the lads in terms of how well they stuck to it against probably the form team in world rugby at the minute, so we're really, really pleased with the effort.

"That's a bit more like us in terms of the attitude and probably something we didn't quite show in the first half against England and Ireland."

Wales have now lost three of their four games and wrap up their campaign against Italy next week, when they should get a second win of their campaign.

Biggar said the positivity behind his team's display made him "really, really pleased".

"But ultimately when you play against big teams and good teams in tight Test matches, one or two moments decide it," he said, "and we didn't quite come on the right side of them."

 
 

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