Wales to use Gatland factor as motivation against France - Davies

Wales to use Gatland factor as motivation against France - Davies

Gareth Davies admitted Wales' players are desperate to ensure Warren Gatland's run as coach does not end with a Rugby World Cup quarter-final defeat to France on Sunday.


Gatland has already confirmed he will step down after the tournament in Japan, ending a successful 12-year stint at the helm, during which time he has won four Six Nations titles and led Wales to the World Cup semi-finals in 2011.

Les Bleus stand between Wales and another last-four contest, with scrum-half Davies revealing the team are keen to avoid giving Gatland a flat farewell with a loss to France.

"We all knew it was going to be Gats' last tournament in charge of us and we do speak about it every now and again," he told reporters at a news conference.

"Alun Wyn [Jones] is a great captain, he speaks really well, and I'm sure he'll mention the fact that it could be Gats' last game.

"As players, we'll bear that in the back of our minds. Hopefully that will give us a couple of extra percentage to come away with a good victory."



Wales were boosted by Dan Biggar (head), Jonathan Davies (knee) and George North (ankle) all training on Tuesday, the trio having missed the win over Uruguay.

They will go into the France game as favourites having won seven of the eight matches the two have played since 2011, when Les Bleus claimed a narrow 9-8 success in the World Cup semi-finals.

However, having fallen 16-0 behind before rallying to win 24-19 in their last encounter at this year's Six Nations, attack coach Stephen Jones is keen for Wales to avoid another sloppy start.

"It is important we learn the lessons from that match," he said.

"The positives are we stayed in the fight and got back and won that game.

"We've definitely taken some lessons on board from that first half. France have a great pool of players to choose from, they are great athletes, and very unpredictable. They enjoy the broken field.

"If we are loose and turn ball over easily then they will be in their element and very, very dangerous."

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